Does an Employer have to Purchase or have Workers’ Compensation Insurance?

Most employers in Minnesota are required to have Minnesota Workers’ Compensation insurance, or for some companies, be self-insured. There are certain limited situations where an employer may not need to have coverage, however, in most situations they are required to have workers' compensation insurance on their employees. Even though a Minnesota employer may not have workers' compensation insurance at the time of an injury, there are laws in place protecting injured workers.

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How Long do Workers’ Compensation Benefits Last in Minnesota?

How Long do Workers’ Compensation Benefits Last in Minnesota? Injuries can range from strains to fractures to no wage loss to being permanently and totally disabled where you can never return to work. The benefits an injured worker receives depends on the injury and whether that injury continues to remain a substantial contributing factor in their disability. Tied into this is the limits on the four types of benefits that an injured employee is entitled. I have previously written on the benefits available. That being said, an injured worker can receive certain benefits for the rest of their

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If I accept a retirement package or severance, would I be entitled to benefits now or in the future?

If I accept a retirement package or severance, would I be entitled to benefits now or in the future? Accepting a retirement package or severance will not preclude you from receiving benefits including lost wages. In cases of voluntary termination, the injured worker's right to wage loss benefits is suspended until the injured worker can show that the work-related disability is the cause for the inability to find or hold new employment. This can be established by work restrictions and an active job search on the part of the injured worker.

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Abbreviations and Glossary for MN Work Comp 101

Minnesota workers' compensation has many abbreviations that get used by adjusters, attorneys, employers, etc. Understanding what they represent is a difficult task for employee's who have never dealt with workers' compensation. The following is a list of common abbreviations and terms used. Some people may abbreviate terms differently, but hopefully it will provide some guidance in distinguishing the various abbreviations.

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The Employer and Insurer have Stopped Paying my Medical Bills and will not Approve any Further Treatment with my Doctor—What are my Legal Options?

The Employer and Insurer have Stopped Paying my Medical Bills and will not Approve any Further Treatment with my Doctor—What are my Legal Options? As I have discussed in previous posts, the employer and insurer are responsible for all reasonable, necessary and causally related medical treatment.  This would include visits to your doctor, physical therapy, injections, chiropractic treatment, surgery, etc.  Now, there are limits to certain treatment based on the Minnesota Treatment Parameters which limit the types and duration of treatment that an injured worker can receive for admitted

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I Was Hurt at Work—What Should I Do Now?

I Was Hurt at Work—What Should I Do Now? When you have an on-the-job injury it can be anything from a cut, strain, fracture, etc. For most employees when they have a work-related injury, they don’t know what to do. It can become a very complicated and stressful situation. Consequently, it is a good idea to know what your injured worker’s rights are under Minnesota Workers' Compensation law. Here are a few helpful tips.

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I Have Carpal Tunnel—Is This Related to My Work?

I Have Carpal Tunnel—Is This Related to My Work? Minnesota Workers’ Compensation covers various work-related injuries including carpal tunnel syndrome or CTS if it is related to your work exposure. These types of injuries are called repetitive trauma/cumulative trauma/Gillette type injuries. It is important once you know that the injury is work-related that you report it to your employer. Then, follow the employer’s policies in terms of reporting an injury. If necessary, contact a workers’ compensation lawyer to determine the best route of obtaining workers' compensation benefits.

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I Have Received a Notice of Intention to Discontinue Benefits from the Workers’ Compensation Insurance Company—Now What Do I Do?

When the insurance company decides that they are going to stop paying you wage loss benefits they are required under the law to file what is called a Notice of Intention to Discontinue Benefits or NOID.  The form you receive provides various instructions on how to request a conference concerning your benefits.  Typically, you have a very short window, sometimes 12 days, in order to request a conference.  You want to make sure that you request a conference as the conference will provide you with an opportunity to dispute and contest the stopping of your wage loss benefits.  This type of

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A day late and a dollar short | When are Minnesota workers’ compensation wage loss benefits due?

One of the most asked questions I get from potential clients and existing clients is, "When can I expect my check?" Often times this is a question that requires further looking into such as when was the last time they received a check, whether an NOID was filed, etc. Often times we discover that the insurer failed to make payment despite their legal obligation to do so. Even worse is when we learn the injured worker has not received any wage loss benefits despite a clear connection between the wage loss and the work injury.We all have a role within the workers' compensation process. Whether it

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